Meningococcal Disease Surveillance in Germany

Current Status:
December 1, 2020

The system is currently updated to run without flash player. Therefore the map browser is not fully available/may have issues and data update is paused.

EpiScanGIS will be up and running again beginning of Mai 2021. Sorry for the inconvenience.

Detecting meningococcal disease outbreaks as early as possible is important in order to minimize the number of infections amongst the population. EpiScanGIS uses a Geographical Information System (GIS) to present maps showing the distribution of all cases of meningococcal disease, that have been registered at the National Reference Centre for Meningococci (NRZM) in Germany. Thus it acts as early warning system, that provides you with easy to access and timely information on meningococcal diseases in Germany.
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Start EpiScanGIS - Web Surveillance

The map browser allows you to explore the geographical distribution of all cases of meningococcal disease, that occurred in Germany since December 2001.

The EpiScanGIS Manual gives you a brief introduction on the software and explains how it is used.

Publications

EpiScanGIS and its implementation has been published in the International Journal of Health Geographics. Please download the paper under the following link: http://www.ij-healthgeographics.com/content/7/1/33

        Reinhardt M, Elias J, Albert J, Frosch M, Harmsen D, Vogel U.
        EpiScanGIS: an online geographic surveillance system for meningococcal disease.
        Int J Health Geogr.
        2008 Jul 1;7:33.
        PubMed PMID: 18593474; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2483700
      

SaTScan analysis based on meningococcal finetypes has been published by Elias et al. Please download the paper under the following link: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol12no11/06-0682.htm

        Elias J, Harmsen D, Claus H, Hellenbrand W, Frosch M, Vogel U.
        Spatiotemporal analysis of invasive meningococcal disease, Germany.
        Emerg Infect Dis.
        2006 Nov;12(11):1689-95.
        PubMed PMID: 17283618.